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how to pack your kitchen

How To Pack Your Kitchen

Know what you’ll need to safely pack up your kitchen

cross country movers

How To Pack Your Kitchen

Often, the kitchen is the hub of the home. A place to gather and share stories while preparing and eating daily meals. It contains all the dishes, pots and pans and the many utensils required for a well stocked kitchen. Knick –knacks and loose items may be distributed along the surfaces or fill the drawers. All these items need to be prepared and packed carefully to ensure they sustain the journey.

Organize

First thing, go through each cupboard, drawer, and pantry and get rid of anything that will not be moving with you to your new home. You can give to friends, sell or donate many of the items.

Prior to moving day, all perishable and frozen foods will need to be disposed of, given to friends or can be donated to local food banks.

Packing Materials

Make sure to have plenty of packing supplies before you begin. You will need an assortment of different sized boxes including:

  • Large boxes (18 x 18 x 24) – this size can be used for lightweight kitchenware, and items such as baking tins and hard to pack items.
  • Medium boxes (18 x 18 x 16) – this size can be used for heavier items such as pots and pans, small appliances, cookbooks and pantry items.
  • Heavy Duty Boxes (18 x 18 x 28) – These boxes are ideal for packing any fragile items and things like plates, glasses and bottles.
  • Unprinted newspaper wrap
  • Tissue Paper for fragile glasses
  • Cell Kits (18 x 18)
  • Packing/Sealing Tape
  • Marker labels

Note: Cell kits can be very useful when packing glasses, stemware, or wine and liquor bottles. They can also be used to pack figurines, vases, and canisters. Check the sizes of your cell kits to ensure they'll fit into the boxes you have.

Pack Items Not Frequently Used

Begin with packing the items that you do not use regularly. These items could include:

  • Selection of glasses: wine, champagne, martini
  • Special occasion dinnerware/silverware
  • Small appliances: mixer, blender, juicer etc.
  • Mixing bowls
  • Baking items and utensils
  • Linens: Tablecloths, serviettes, dish cloths

Be sure to label boxes clearly with the contents, you may need to add to these boxes closer to moving day with additional items of the same or similar description.

Packing Bottles

Wine collections and other alcohol beverages can be packed at the beginning along with any other unopened bottles you decide on moving, such as cooking oils.

Packing Drawers And Shelves

When emptying your drawers to pack the contents, it is an opportunity to get rid of items you no longer need or do not use.

When packing up the cutlery drawer, leave one set for each person. You can keep these unpacked ones in your essentials box. Or, if you prefer, pack everything and use reusable disposable products.

Cookbooks need to be packed flat in small boxes

Packing Appliances

Clean and dry appliances prior to packing. Now is the time to use that box you have kept all these years in the garage. If you still have the original boxes for your appliances, pack them back up. Include any of the manuals making sure everything is together. Alternatively, create a folder for all your owner manuals. If you no longer have the original boxes, bubble wrap will keep them safe. Place the heavier appliances at the bottom of the box, with lighter pieces on top.

Packing Dinnerware

Ensure the bottom of the box is lined with double layer of packing paper or bubble wrap. Wrap each piece of dinnerware with a thin layer of packing paper and stack them one at a time in the box, adding an extra layer of bubble wrap or paper in between every three dishes.

Packing Fragile Glassware

Packing glasses and stemware into cell boxes will reduce breakage. Take time when packing fragile glassware.

  • Using several sheets of tissue paper, gently stuff the interior of the glass making sure to not press too hard.
  • Lay out several sheets of tissue paper and using 2-3 pieces, gently wrap the glass.
  • Wrap the glass in a piece of the packing paper and gently fold the ends of the paper down around the globe and stem, carefully molding it to the glass. Add a 2nd sheet of packing paper using the same technique.
  • Place the glass into one of the cells, stem first. Gently pack tissue or bubble wrap into any open spaces.
  • After you fill each cell and the box is full, place bubble wrap or tissue paper on top of the packed stemware to ensure there's no room for movement.
  • Secure the flaps and then gently shake the box. If the box rattles, there are some gaps that need to be filled.
  • Mark the box "FRAGILE"

Packing Silverware

If packed loosely, silverware can damage any items it may be sharing a box with. Sorting all your silverware prior to packing will save you time once you are ready to unpack. You can wrap each set or type with a rubber band and place it all in a shoebox. If there is a lot of movement in the box, fill it with packing paper. Tape the box closed and write the contents on it.

Packing Pots And Pans

In order to find the right size box to pack your pots and pans, place your largest pan into a box horizontally and diagonally. If the lid of the box closes securely, it’s the right size. Wrap pots and pans individually and stack them before placing them into the box. Any lids should also be wrapped in packing paper and can be placed underneath the handles of the pots/pans.

Packing The Pantry

Any food and condiments remaining to be packed should be sealed or taped up, ensuring no spillage occurs while in transit.

Now that your kitchen is packed and ready, there’s no excuse not to go eat at your favorite restaurant!

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