Skip to Main
moving with children

Moving With Children

Tips when moving with children

cross country movers

Moving With Children

Children need time and preparation when having to adjust to change and new situations. They are accustomed to what is familiar and known.

Once the decision has been made to move to a new home or relocate, inform your children, even the youngest. If you have older children, maybe you want to include them in the decision process.

Let your children know why the move will be taking place. Children pick up on the emotions of adults and for a move of this scale, the children will rely on the adults for reassurance. Be sympathetic and understanding to their reactions, children may react differently. Listen to any questions, thoughts or concerns they may have. It is very important for a smooth moving experience that everyone is feeling calm.

Involve The Children

Being involved in the planning of the move can help make children feel excited. If you’re still deciding where to move, or looking for a new house, let them be part of the process. Nowadays with the Internet, everything is accessible via the web. Make the upcoming move adventurous. If your children have specific hobbies or favorite activities, find where these can be continued.

Prior To Moving Day

Time the move – If circumstances allow, time your move to fit into your children’s schedule. If you have children in school, wait until the summer to move when there is plenty of time. This allows your children time to transition and settle into their new surroundings.

Make a plan – Create a Moving Timeline and include things which are important to your children, such as: having a farewell party, eating at their favorite restaurant or ice cream parlor. Set a time when these events will take place. This will give your children something to look forward to and make the move a fun experience.

Have fun packing – Some children might enjoy the packing process, you could set aside a box with some paper and toys and let them “pack”. If your children are not into packing, schedule a play date with a friend or have family lend a hand and take the kids while you do the packing. With older children, they might need more guidance rather than you packing for them. Encourage the keep, discard or donate method.

Pack Essentials – Make sure to pack some essentials for your children. Pack according to the time your items will be in transit and for the first night in your new home. Having these items on hand can make the move far easier for both you and your children. You may want to include:

  • Diapers / wipes
  • Bags for dirty diapers
  • Spare clothing
  • A few favorite toys / books
  • Formula and snacks
  • Extra pacifiers
  • Blankets
  • Car seat / Stroller / Carrier
  • Medications and first aid kit

You can also review First Day Essentials, for additional items you might want to pack.

Children’s records – If you have children in school and they will be attending a new school, make sure that you have both their school and medical records transferred.

Read books – If any of your children are feeling anxious about the move, whatever their age, there are some excellent books to help them understand the process and what it includes, and to feel more secure. A few titles to explore are:

  • We’re moving by Heather Maisner
  • Anastasia Again by Lois Lowry
  • The Berenstain Bears’ Moving Day by Stan & Jan Berenstain
  • Who Will Be My Friends by SYD HOFF

Moving Day

If your children will be present on the day of the move, prepare them beforehand for what to expect. There may be a lot of commotion in your home. If you have hired a moving company to transport your belongings, introduce them to the crew upon arrival.

Keeping your kids busy will make the day easier for everyone. Prepare a to do list to easily delegate tasks and keep them engaged and focused. Make sure your children remain safe while carrying out their tasks.

If possible create a quiet area where they can go when needed. Have some books, some form of entertainment and some snacks prepared. Then, if they feel like it, they can continue helping.

Settling In

Upon arrival to your new home, if it’s the first time the children have seen it, go for a tour together, let them explore. Point out any special traits the home may have.

Focus on your children’s rooms first, arranging and unpacking. If they would like to decorate, have them help choose colors. Together, find familiarity in the new.

Keeping your routine when it comes to such things as mealtime and bedtimes can help children ease into their new environment. Along with having some of their essentials close by. Staying connected to old friends can provide comfort and make the settling in phase easier. Help your children with this. Staying connected with your children is also important.

Remaining positive throughout the transition is vital, your kids will pick up on your positivity and follow. If any of your children don’t want to participate in the moving process, don’t make them. Be patient with them and find something else for them to do, something that they enjoy.

Back to top